Fun things to do in and around Pueblo

Pueblo is teeming with unique locations and authentic experiences. And, while it might take more than one trip to Pueblo, here are several Pueblo places that you must see!

Visit local Pueblo chile farms to experience the world-famous Pueblo chile in a way the whole family will enjoy. Meet the farmers who grow it, explore their farms, and even pick your own. Then, have it roasted fresh right before your eyes and enjoy the intoxicating aroma that'll keep you coming back for more. 

The Arkansas River levee is the canvas for the Pueblo Levee Mural Project‚ a 3-mile-long piece of artwork that holds the Guinness Book of World Records’ distinction as being the world’s largest continuous painting. Not bad for some­thing that began 30 years ago as isolated graffiti and was not embraced by the community at large.  

Blessed with water, sunshine and fertile soil, St. Charles Mesa was settled in the late 1800s/early 1900s by mostly Italian immigrants. These families continue to farm the land of their ancestors with world-famous Mira Sol chiles and lots of other farm-fresh wonders. During the growing and harvest seasons, people can visit farms to buy produce and even pick their own.

The Arkansas River that slices through Pueblo’s downtown area is a recreation rock star, offering everything from fly-fishing and rafting west of Pueblo to world-class bird watching and fishing at Valco Ponds. For kayakers and boogie boarders, Pueblo’s Whitewater Park is an urban kayak course with eight drops and is surrounded by a collective mural considered the world’s longest public-created art.

This amazing one-man-made castle is part artistry, part craftsmanship and part entertainment. Nestled right along the edge of the San Isabel National Forest, the castle is still a work-in-progress – created only with the heavy labor of artisan Jim Bishop. Bishop is also well-known for his hand-painted signs and spontaneous soliloquies.

Pueblo, Colorado is the location for this innovative undertaking – and rightfully so – Pueblo is known as the Home of Heroes. The community boasts the unique distinction as being the home of four Congressional Medal of Honor recipients. President Dwight D. Eisenhower once remarked, after bestowing the Medal of Honor upon Raymond G. “Jerry” Murphy, “What is it in the water out there in Pueblo … all you guys turn out to be heroes.”  The Center's mission stems from the desire for all generations to understand and never lose sight of sacrifices made by civilians and veterans alike to elevate America as the greatest Country in the world.  

The InfoZone News Museum is an interactive news museum. The InfoZone News Museum's mission is to provide broader knowledge of news and information. The museum focuses on journalism, the First Amendment, historic news and current events that affect our world. The museum serves to promote the joy of reading and writing, to preserve and interpret the archives and artifacts of The Pueblo Chieftain and provide educational programs and exhibitions that enhance the Pueblo City-County Library District.

This nationally designated scenic byway climbs from Pueblo's high plains, up through Hardscrabble Canyon into the Wet Mountain Valley, and descends back through the foothills onto the high plains at Colorado City. Along the byway, visitors can stop in Westcliffe, a quaint mountain town, with great shopping, wildflower meadows, intimate views of the Sangre de Cristo mountains, and plenty of summer festivals. Check out Additional Information: FrontierPathways.org Frontier Pathways Itinerary Frontier Pathways Guide Tour Colorado

Witness a relic of American industry by visiting this treasure, which sits across the Interstate from the still-pulsing steel mill. Blessed with amazing archives and artifacts from everything to former coal town maps to medical equipment, this museum captures a quintessential American story of immigration, industrialization, innovation and conflict.

Just one hour east of Pueblo sits Bent’s Old Fort National Historic Site, a reconstructed 1840’s adobe fur trading post on the mountain branch of the Santa Fe Trail where traders, trappers, travelers and Plains Indian tribes came together in peaceful terms for trade. Today, living historians recreate the sights, sounds and smells of the past with guided tours, demonstrations, and special events.

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